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Howard County stays 'orange' in state metrics map

'Red' counties decrease from 21 counties last week to 17

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Metrics

The Indiana State Department of Health released its updated color-coded state metrics map that tracks the spread of COVID in communities and now signifies county-by-county restrictions for those in orange and red -- and fewer counties this week scored "red." 

Last week, 21 counties earned "red," the worst score possible, and that decreased to 17 counties this week. The majority are "orange," the second worst color, including Howard County, and only one county scored "yellow." None were ranked "blue," the best score possible. 

The weekly score colors are assigned based on weekly cases per 100,000 residents and the seven-day positivity rate. The map is updated every Wednesday at noon.

Weekly cases per 100,000 residents

For the second week in a row, every Indiana county scored "red" in the category of weekly cases per 100,000 residents, which is given when there are 200 or more new cases per 100,000 residents. 

Howard County had 974 new cases per 100,000 residents, up from 426 last week, and was flagged with an alert that signified a large number of the weekly cases were attributable to congregate settings. Nearly 300 of Howard County's cases recently have stemmed from the Howard County jail.

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7-day all tests positivity rate

In the category of seven-day all tests positivity rate, there was more color on the map.

One county, Rush, scored blue, while 24 counties scored "yellow," including Howard. The majority were "orange," and 17 were "red." 

Daily update

Today, the Indiana State Department of Health reported 6,059 new cases of the virus and 63 new deaths. Of those, 93 cases and two deaths were in Howard County.

Now, 3,442 Howard County residents have tested positive for the virus, and 77 have died. The majority of deaths, 54.5 percent, have been in those ages 80 and older.